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Using Lavender Essential Oil for Yeast Infections

Lavender Oil is a Safe Choice for Getting Rid of Candida Problems

 
Lavander essential oil may work against Candida primarily due to the presence of linalool in the oil. This chemical compound is very effective at killing of this pathogenic yeast.
Lavander essential oil may work against Candida primarily due to the presence of linalool in the oil. This chemical compound is very effective at killing of this pathogenic yeast.

Lavender oil has been used for over 2,500 years; and, the medicinal uses of this essential oil have been seen in ancient texts. Very early records indicate this oil was used in the mummification process in Egypt. And, in addition to all the many therapeutic uses for this oil; it can also be utilized to treat a yeast infection. Although capable of allaying Candida; lavender oil is not one of the strongest essential oils against this yeast. Although it should be noted, many essential oils have a very powerful ability to stop Candida. So, it ranks as one of the lesser Candida fighters amongst an array of very efficacious essential oils. Therefore, it’s still quite a good choice!

Much of pure lavender oil is produced in the Balkans. Essential oil is derived from lavender by taking the flowering tops of the plant and using them in steam distillation. Lavender has a wide variety of therapeutic uses, aside from its antifungal ability. One of note, is that lavender oil is antiviral; and can help reduce a cold (rhinovirus) or influenza; and, the inflammation that arises because of these viral infections (Thosar, Nilima, et al.; 2013).

Because of lavender oil’s excellent aroma, it can make a great addition to a culinary recipe (just be sure only to use a very small concentration; as essential oils can be toxic if enough is consumed). According to Eric Zielinski, D.C; in his book The Healing Power of Essential Oils; lavender essential oil is quite potent against Candida. The book states research has compared lavender essential oil to clotrimazole; when using it for vaginal yeast infections. Zielinski states lavender essential oil is one of the safest oils to use. This author suggests taking lavender essential oil internally to help combat yeast in the body. Adding a drop of lavender oil into a small batch of homemade chocolate (sweetened with stevia extract) is suggested as a great way to do this; especially if you crave sweets.

Linalool is a primary component of lavender essential oil. A study, discussed later on, found that a 0.5% concentration of linalool killed all the Candida cells it was in contact with in just 30 seconds (D’auria, F. D., et. al; 2005). Linalool, therefore, has very powerful action against Candida. After ingesting lavender oil, linalool is excreted primarily in the urine; but, is also removed via the feces and exhaled through breathing (Malcom, B.; Tallian, K.; 2017) . Thus, taking a small amount of lavender oil internally, may help to mitigate a systemic yeast infection.

Although lavender oil is a great natural medicine for yeast infections, you may want to add in a few other essential oils to a topical, or intravaginal, treatment. The late Dr. James Duke, stated in his book The Green Pharmacy, that mixing herbs together can bring about a healing, synergistic effect. Since essential oils are derived from herbs; and work via the plant’s phytochemicals as well; this logic should work well with oils too. It may be, that one plant oil will attack Candida in a certain manner; and, another plant oil will have a different mechanism for doing this. Consequently, you may want to get a few essential oils to use; and, not just rely on lavender oil alone. Just be cautious if you plan on ingesting an essential oil—as many oils can be poisonous at different levels. Tea tree oil, for instance, should never be ingested—as it is highly toxic.

There is a lot of research supporting the fact that lavender essential oil works effectively to inhibit and kill Candida. Let’s take a look at some of the research regarding lavender essential oil and its anti-Candida capabilities.

Research on Lavender Oil & Candida

The herb lavender should work well itself; and soap with lavender flowers may help get rid of skin yeast infections. You can also try adding some lavender essential oil into a sitz bath, to help get rid of a genital Candida problem!
The herb lavender should work well itself; and soap with lavender flowers may help get rid of skin yeast infections. You can also try adding some lavender essential oil into a sitz bath, to help get rid of a genital Candida problem!

The first study we will examine; was published in Medical Mycology [43.5 (2005): 391-396]. This study demonstrates a great deal of information regarding lavender essential oil in regards to Candida. The aspects of Candida investigated, related to this oil, included: germ tube formation, killing time, and growth inhibition. Also, the chemical composition of the oil used in the study was evaluated. Thus, this research is a comprehensive array of pertinent information regarding this oil’s ability to get rid of a yeast infection.

The species of lavender, the oil in the study was derived from, was Lavandula angustifolia Mill.. The study also tested some pure components of lavender oil on Candida. The components were linalool (97% pure) and linalyl acetate (97% pure). For the tests on Candida albicans (C. albicans), the essential oil, and these two components, were dissolved in ethanol (the alcohol found in beer and wine), and then diluted. The study also tested the antifungal drugs fluconazole, ketoconazole, and miconazole.

Concerning lavender oil’s ability to inhibit the growth of C. albicans, concentrations from 0.125% to 2%, were able to inhibit the growth of this yeast. The study tested strains of C. albicans from vaginal infections and oral infections. The strains of C. albicans from vaginal infections were more susceptible to the essential oil; compared to those from oral Candidiasis. Concerning the ability of the lavender oil to kill C. albicans, the minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC) varied from 1.1% to 1.8%; thus, showing a strong killing ability. Concerning the study’s analysis of the germ tube growth inhibition, lavender oil was able to stop germ tube formations at a very low concentration of 0.09%.

Regarding primary components of lavender essential oil alone, the study’s tests indicated that linalool was more effective against C. albicans than was linalyl acetate. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC; which indicates the lowest concentration necessary to arrest growth) of linalool ranged from 0.09% to 0.29%. The MFC for linalool ranged from 0.1% to 0.3%. Thus, the pure components of lavender essential oil, perform somewhat better against C. albicans, than the essential oil itself.

In regards to the time it took for this oil and chemicals to kill C. albicans, it did not take much time. At a concentration of 0.5%, lavender oil killed 98% of the yeast cells within 30 minutes. At a 2% concentration, lavender oil killed 99% of the yeast cells within 5 minutes; and, 100% of the cells within 15 minutes. Linalool was the best killer of the yeast cells; at a concentration of 0.5%, this chemical killed 100% of the yeast cells within 30 seconds. Concerning linalyl acetate, at a concentration of 2%, this chemical killed 93% of the yeast cells within 30 minutes. Thus, the great degree of anti-Candida ability of lavender oil may be due, to a good degree, to the presence of linalool.

The quotation directly below, was taken from the study. The authors of the research state that lavender oil’s ability against C. albicans can be important for people with impaired immune systems. Below this quotation, is a chart taken from the study; showing a graphical representation of some of the study’s findings. You can see how quickly a 0.5% concentration of linalool got rid of the yeast cells by the sharp rise of the black triangle line.

In the present study, lavender oil showed both fungistatic and fungicidal activity against C. albicans strains. It also inhibited germ tube formation at concentrations lower than those required for yeast inhibition. The finding that lavender oil exerts fungicidal activity against C. albicans is particularly important when considering that many patients with fungal diseases have a seriously impaired immune system.

Medical Mycology [43.5 (2005): 391-396]
The above chart illustrates the ability of lavender essential oil, and some its chemical components, to kill (cytocidal ability) Candida albicans. The different lines indicate varying concentrations of the substances. The x-axis of the chart designates time in minutes. The y-axis of the chart indicates how many colony forming units (CFUs) were killed.
--Click to Enlarge--
The above chart illustrates the ability of lavender essential oil, and some its chemical components, to kill (cytocidal ability) Candida albicans. The different lines indicate varying concentrations of the substances. The x-axis of the chart designates time in minutes. The y-axis of the chart indicates how many colony forming units (CFUs) were killed.

Another study, looked at lavender oil along with other essential oils; these included: tea tree, peppermint, thyme, and eugenol. Although eugenol is not an essential oil, clove essential oil is similar. Clove oil is comprised of about 89% eugenol (Cortes-Rojas, Diego F.; et. al.; 2014). The study analyzed the effects these oils produced against bacteria and C. albicans. According to the authors, essential oils have been used traditionally in various parts of the world.

Concerning the ability of this essential oil to stop C. albicans, the research found lavender oil was in fact quite capable of doing this. The study found the MIC for lavender oil against C. albicans to be 8 mcl / ml; a concentration of 0.8%. The study also ascertained the MFC for the oil against C. albicans; which was found to be 16 mcl / ml; a concentration of 1.6%. The lavender essential oil also performed well against the three bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Escherischia coli, and Enterococcus faecalis) tested in this research. Below is a chart taken from this study, showing how lavender essential oil worked to inhibit and kill the various bacteria and C. albicans. Note that ‘MBC’ stands for minimum bactericidal concentration.

The chart above shows various essential oils, listed on the left, tested against bacteria and Candida albicans. The results are listed in microliters (µl) per milliliter. Note that a microliter is one thousandth of a milliliter.
--Click to Enlarge--
The chart above shows various essential oils, listed on the left, tested against bacteria and Candida albicans. The results are listed in microliters (µl) per milliliter. Note that a microliter is one thousandth of a milliliter.

Further Research

Even more powerful against Candida than lavender oil, is one of this oil’s main chemical constituents: linalool. Linalool may be more harsh on the skin; and, this powerful phytochemical should be used with caution!
Even more powerful against Candida than lavender oil, is one of this oil’s main chemical constituents: linalool. Linalool may be more harsh on the skin; and, this powerful phytochemical should be used with caution!

Another study, utilized lavender against C. albicans; the research was published in Scientifica [2015 (2015): 261397]. The species of lavender used to create the essential oil was Lavandula angustifolia. The study reiterates the common statistic that 75% of women will develop a vaginal yeast infection at least once in their lives. Additionally, the study states that 45% of all women develop vaginal yeast infections twice a year. Another ubiquitous statistic, is also given by the study regarding C. albicans; i.e., that this specific species of Candida is responsible for 85% to 95% of all vaginal yeast infections. Thus, the research’s use of C. albicans, is very relevant to how lavender essential oil will perform in most Candidiasis situations. The study states that lavender oil has been shown to fight C. albicans in vitro (in a test environment outside of a living thing) and in clinical studies.

Concerning the research this study conducted, it also found lavender oil was effective at deterring C. albicans; but not to a great extent. These results seem confusing; given the findings of the two previous studies. What is likely the reason, is that the study diluted the lavender essential oil, not in water, but in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). A quotation, explaining this dilution process, is below. The quotation clearly states that the lavender was mixed with DMSO and diluted to various concentrations. The C. albicans cells were then added to the wells with the diluted lavender essential oil. Also note that clotrimazole, a common antifungal drug, was also tested in the same manner as the lavender oil. The quote from the study is as follows:

After preparing the half-McFarland suspension of the C. albicans, lavender and clotrimazole dilution was performed. Thus, lavender with pure solvent DMSO (Dimethyl Sulfoxide) was diluted to 1/5 in a sterile tube, and the same procedure was also performed for clotrimazole. Then, the dilutions of 1/10, 1/20, 1/40, 1/80, and 1/160 of each drug were prepared and poured in 5 wells of a microplate. In the sixth well of a microplate, the DMSO control was poured and, ultimately, 100 microliters of half-McFarland suspension of fungi was added to all the wells of a microplate.

Scientifica [2015 (2015): 261397]

A chart from the study, which is shown below, seems to indicate this as well. It is quite funny how the 1/160 dilution of lavender essential oil seems to perform better than the 1/10 dilution of this oil. The results of the study are clearly unusual. The key, probably is, that the poor choice for using DMSO for a solvent; as it is established lavender essential oil inhibits Candida. The study also stated: "Some drugs are more effective at lower dilutions." There is likely a chemical reaction taking place with both the drug clotrimazole and lavender oil with the DMSO; given that even clotrimazole performed better at a lower concentration (dilution). The study stated the aerial (above ground; i.e., in the air) parts of the plant were used to create the essential oil. Another thought is that the quality of the lavender oil was poor; due possibly to improper production of the oil used in the study. Possibly, undesirable above ground parts of the lavender plant were used to create the oil; thereby altering its chemical composition. Below is the chart from the study, indicating the effects the substances had on C. albicans after 48 hours of time had passed.

Note that the above chart lists the control as dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO); shown as the blue bar. The cell counts of C. albicans are denoted by the y-axis. The x-axis shows the dilutions and the substance used. These results were obtained after 48 hours of the diluted substances interacting with the yeast cells.
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Note that the above chart lists the control as dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO); shown as the blue bar. The cell counts of C. albicans are denoted by the y-axis. The x-axis shows the dilutions and the substance used. These results were obtained after 48 hours of the diluted substances interacting with the yeast cells.

Another study looked at a wide array of different plant essential oils; and how they fared at inhibiting and killing C. albicans. Included in these tested oils was lavender oil made from Lavandula angustifolia. The study was published in the Journal of Microbiology, Immunology and Infection [43.5 (2010): 447-451]. The research found that lavender oil would effectively inhibit C. albicans. The MIC for lavender oil used against C. albicans was over 3%. The MFC for lavender oil against C. albicans was also somewhere over 3%. Although the exact values for lavender oil were not stated, the oil effectively inhibited and killed C. albicans in the research.

In total, this research analyzed 30 different plant oils for their action against C. albicans. The oils were assigned into three categories based on their effectiveness: most effective, moderately effective, and least effective. Lavender oil was not one of the best performers; and, was classified as least effective. The other oils tested in the study performed much better. The two best performers were eucalyptus (Eucalyptus globulus) and peppermint (Mentha piperita); with eucalyptus being slightly better than peppermint. Eucalyptus had an MIC against C. albicans of 0.05%; and an MFC against this yeast of 0.12%.

The study also found the zone of inhibition for the various essential oils. To do this, a 5 microliter drop of each essential oil was placed with C. albicans and allowed to incubate for 48 hours. The zone of inhibition for the lavender oil was 1.2 millimeters. For the best performer, eucalyptus, the zone of inhibition was found to be 26.7 millimeters. Clearly, although lavender oil is a capable inhibitor, and killer, of Candida; other essential oils appear to be able to work better.

Side Effects of Lavender Oil

Lavender essential oil is one of the safer oils that you can use. You can even include small amounts in food recipes. However, rarely, side effects can occur via using this herb.
Lavender essential oil is one of the safer oils that you can use. You can even include small amounts in food recipes. However, rarely, side effects can occur via using this herb.

According to a study, published in Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine [2013 (2013)], lavender oil does not have many side effects. The study states short term therapy with this oil is relatively safe. Another research article, also discusses the safety of this oil. The research was published in Mental Health Clinician [7.4 (2017): 147-155]. The study states that lavender essential oil has been given the Generally Recognized as Safe (GRAS) status by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). This means that it is generally safe to use for its intended purpose as a food additive.

As with all herbs and oils, even those with GRAS certification, there are some side effects that can occur when using lavender. These include:

  • Gynecomastia (abnormal enlargement of men’s chest tissue) occurred in three boys aged 7 to 10 years old, after topical application of this oil. The gynecomastia went away in all the young men after they stopped using products containing lavender oil.
  • Digestive system side effects can occur; such as dyspepsia (indigestion) and nausea.
  • Allergies to lavender exist; and, allergic reactions can occur.
  • Women who are pregnant or breastfeeding should avoid ingesting lavender, due to the herb having emmenagogue ability (it can stimulate the menstrual flow).
  • Lavender poisoning can result in excessive drowsiness and confusion.
  • Although lavender’s topical application is well tolerated, contact dermatitis (a skin rash) can result from using this oil.

Linda Allen’s 12 Hour Yeast Infection Remedy

Linda Allen’s Yeast Infection No More

There are many women who suffer from repeat yeast infections; to the point where they develop several in the course of each year. The author Linda Allen, was in the past, suffering from this condition. In all, Linda spent about 12 years suffering from recurrent yeast infections. She tried going to professional medical doctors, and using prescription drugs. However, these avenues of help never worked permanently. Through a great deal of research and investigation, Linda was able to find a solution to this problem.

Linda’s difficulties started to happen in her late teen years; and, she also developed a sinus infection at about this time. When Linda developed a yeast infection, she went to a medical doctor and was prescribed an antifungal drug. Linda used the antifungal successfully, and her yeast infection went away. However, after time went by, Linda developed another yeast infection. Like before she went back to the doctor, and was given another prescription medication. The prescription drug solved her problem again; but, in a manner of time, the yeast infection returned yet again.

While Linda was fighting recurrent Candidiasis, her overall health began to decline. Linda frequently made appointments with medical doctors for any help she could get. However, all that happened was that she kept getting prescribed antibiotics to remedy her health problems. Linda even was placed on allergy medication. The drugs Linda took seemed to temporarily make her feel better; but wouldn’t keep her feeling good. Those who knew Linda thought maybe she was in much worse shape than she was admitting; or, that she was a hypochondriac to some degree!

Linda ended up paying a sizeable amount of money into medical bills. And, instead of having a nicer place to live, she could only afford a small apartment. The ordeal was not only taking a tool on Linda’s health, but it was also hurting her financially a great deal.

Eventually Linda made an appointment with a naturopath; and, this changed her life. The naturopath told her that her problems were due to a systemic yeast infection. Learning this helped Linda to start investigating this condition with great fervor. Eventually, through much trial and error and hard work, Linda developed a solution to her problem.

After Linda created her new solution to her Candida problem, she tried it on herself. When she started her treatment plan, Linda found her yeast infection went away quite quickly. And, as time passed, her yeast infection did not return. Within a few weeks of using her new treatment plan, her health began to improve. After a while, Linda started to feel great once again. Linda had been able, through natural medicine, to permanently end her yeast infections; and recover from a systemic Candida problem!

After Linda developed her novel new cure, she decided to help others with her treatment. To do this she wrote a book about how to repeat her success. In this book Linda shows you how to get rid of a yeast infection in just 12 hours of time. So, you can be free from a yeast infection in about half a day. Linda, since the publishing of her book years ago, over 100,000 people from around the world have successfully used Linda’s treatment. Linda truly is an internationally known woman for her exceptional work.

Linda Allen has published her book with a subsidiary of Keynetics Incroproated; a firm based in Boise, Idaho. Linda’s book is available in a digital format from this publisher, and can be downloaded immediately. Linda’s publisher guarantees her book with a 60 day, 100% money back guarantee. If you decide to give Linda’s Candida plan a try, within 60 days after you get her book, you can get a refund of all your money if you were not happy with Linda’s book. This really helps to take the risk out of paying for, what may be, yet another book on yeast infections (if you’ve been searching for a solution like Linda formerly was).

To find out more about Linda Allen, and her great book, you can always visit Linda Allen’s website.

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SOURCES:

  • Google Books — Eric Zielinski, D.C. "The Healing Power of Essential Oils: Soothe Inflammation, Boost Mood, Prevent Autoimmunity, and Feel Great in Every Way." Potter/Ten Speed/Harmony/Rodale [2018]. ISBN: 9781524761370
  • Google Books — Duke, J. A. (1997). The green pharmacy: New discoveries in herbal remedies for common diseases and conditions from the world's foremost authority on healing herbs. Emmaus, Pa: Rodale Press.
  • https://doi.org/10.1080/13693780400004810 — D’auria, F. D., et al. "Antifungal activity of Lavandula angustifolia essential oil against Candida albicans yeast and mycelial form." Medical Mycology [43.5 (2005): 391-396].
  • https://dx.doi.org/10.4103/1305-7456.119078 — Thosar, Nilima, et al. "Antimicrobial efficacy of five essential oils against oral pathogens: An in vitro study." European Journal of Dentistry [7.Suppl 1 (2013): S71]. PubMed
  • https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S2221-1691(14)60215-X — Cortes-Rojas, Diego F.; et. al. "Clove (Syzygium aromaticum): a precious spice." Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Biomedicine [2014 Feb; 4(2): 90-96] PubMed
  • http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/261397 — Behmanesh, F., et al. "Antifungal Effect of Lavender Essential Oil (Lavandula angustifolia) and Clotrimazole on Candida albicans: An In Vitro Study." Scientifica [2015 (2015): 261397]
  • https://doi.org/10.1016/S1684-1182(10)60069-2 — Agarwal, Vishnu, Priyanka Lal, and Vikas Pruthi. "Effect of plant oils on Candida albicans." Journal of Microbiology, Immunology and Infection [43.5 (2010): 447-451].
  • https://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/681304 — Koulivand, Peir Hossein, Maryam Khaleghi Ghadiri, and Ali Gorji. "Lavender and the nervous system." Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine [2013 (2013)]. PubMed
  • https://dx.doi.org/10.9740/mhc.2017.07.147 — Malcolm, Benjamin J., and Kimberly Tallian. "Essential oil of lavender in anxiety disorders: Ready for prime time?." Mental Health Clinician [7.4 (2017): 147-155]. PubMed